> The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment Sign up for the Berean: Daily Verse and Comment, and have Biblical truth delivered to your inbox. (e) Gregory's Notes and Observations, &c. ch. 2 Samuel 5:6–10 6 c And the king and his men went to Jerusalem d against the Jebusites, the inhabitants of the land, who said to David, “You will not come in here, but the blind and the lame will ward you off”—thinking, “David cannot come in here.” 7 Nevertheless, David took the stronghold of Zion, e that is, the city of David. 7. It has been several years since I read the excellent book by Langdon Gilkey entitled Shantung Compound. 5. Then came all the tribes to David — That is, elders, deputed as ambassadors from every tribe, sent by a common agreement among them; saying, Behold, we are bone of thy bone, &c. — Abner and Ish-bosheth being dead, whose authority had swayed the Israelites against their duty, they now acknowledged … A learned countryman of ours F5 is of opinion that these were statues or images talismanically made, under a certain constellation, by some skilful in astrology, placed in the recess of the fort, and intrusted with the keeping of it, and in which the utmost confidence was put: but it seems better with Aben Ezra and Abarbinel, and so Josephus F6, to understand this of blind and lame men; and that the sense is, that the Jebusites had such an opinion of the strength of their city, that a few blind and lame men were sufficient to defend it against David and his army; and perhaps in contempt of him placed some invalids, blind and lame men, on the walls of it, and jeeringly told him, that unless he could remove them, he would never take the city: thinking: or "saying" F7; this was the substance of what they said, or what they meant by it: David cannot come in hither; it is impossible for him to enter it, he cannot and shall not do it, and very probably these words were put into the mouths of the blind and lame, and they said them frequently. 2 Samuel 2 Samuel Devotional Commentary ... 2 Samuel 7:22. Our text in 2 Samuel informs us that there was great celebration as the ark was brought to Jerusalem. Psalm 132 is commonly associated with the events of this chapter. HE TAKES ZION FROM THE JEBUSITES. On questions of authorship and composition, Anderson moves in the mainstream of contemporary scholarship. Please enter your email address associated with your Salem All-Pass account, then click Continue. Genial. A list of the best commentaries on 1/2 Samuel ranked by scholars, journal reviews, and site users. California - Do Not Sell My Personal Information. (f) Antiqu. Available at logos.com. A learned countryman of ours (e) is of opinion that these were statues or images talismanically made, under a certain constellation, by some skilful in astrology, placed in the recess of the fort, and intrusted with the keeping of it, and in which the utmost confidence was put: but it seems better with Aben Ezra and Abarbinel, and so Josephus (f), to understand this of blind and lame men; and that the sense is, that the Jebusites had such an opinion of the strength of their city, that a few blind and lame men were sufficient to defend it against David and his army; and perhaps in contempt of him placed some invalids, blind and lame men, on the walls of it, and jeeringly told him, that unless he could remove them, he would never take the city: thinking: or "saying" (g); this was the substance of what they said, or what they meant by it: David cannot come in hither; it is impossible for him to enter it, he cannot and shall not do it, and very probably these words were put into the mouths of the blind and lame, and they said them frequently. Their citadel was upon Mount Zion, the highest of the hills of Jerusalem, south-west of the temple hill of Moriah, and surrounded on three sides by deep valleys. Valtrinum de re militar. The parallel account in 1 Chronicles is even more detailed. 5 All the tribes of Israel came to David at Hebron and said, “We are your own flesh and blood. Thou shalt not come hither; but the blind and the lame shall keep thee off. ((g) "dicendo", Pagninus, Montanus. Themistocl. However, the pictures alone are not worth the price of this commentary. CHAPTER 6. This expression, he useth to admonish David, that he was not made a king to advance his own glory, but for the good of his people; whom he ought to rule with all tenderness, and to watch over with all diligence. Which spake unto David … (1-2) Bringing the ark of God to Jerusalem. 6 The king and his men marched to Jerusalem to attack the Jebusites, who lived there. All rights reserved. Salem Media Group. 2 Samuel 5:6 Context. Shalt feed — That is, rule them, and take care of them, as a shepherd doth of his sheep, Psalms 78:70,71. We'll send you an email with steps on how to reset your password. 2 Samuel 6 – David Brings the Ark of God into Jerusalem. Thou shalt not come hither, for the blind and the lame resist. Again David gathered all the choice men of Israel, thirty thousand. But the pride and insolence of the Jebusites animated David, and the Lord God of hosts was with him. 5 In Hebron he reigned over Judah seven years and six … 6. the king and his men went to Jerusalem unto the Jebusites—The first expedition of David, as king of the whole country, was directed against this place, which had hitherto remained in the hands of the natives. Rom. 1 a David again assembled all the picked men of Israel, thirty thousand in number. Bill T. Arnold — 1 & 2 Samuel (NIV Application Commentary, 2003). The Teach the Text Commentary Series gives pastors the best of biblical scholarship and presents the information needed to move seamlessly from … And the Lord said to you, ‘You will shepherd my people … Robert B. Chisholm Jr.’s volume on the books of 1–2 Samuel provides carefully organized guidance for interpreting, teaching, and illustrating these important historical books. l. 5. c. 5. Copyright © 2020, Bible Study Tools. l. 2. c. 7. One chapter is entitled, “A Place of One's Own.” Gilkey was interned in a Japanese detention camp, along with a diverse group of people, who all had one thing in common -- they were all Westerners. You can find the best commentary on 1/2 Samuel for you using the tools on the right side. Commentaries on 1/2 Samuel. l. 7. c. 3. sect. The Jebusites said to David, “You will not get in here; even … And the king and his men went to Jerusalem Which, at least part of it, belonged to the tribe of Benjamin; and therefore until all Israel, and that tribe, with the rest, made him king, he did not attempt the reduction of it, but now he immediately set out on an expedition against it: unto the Jebusites, the inhabitants of the land: who inhabited the country about it, and even dwelt in that itself; for the tribe of Judah could not drive them out at first from that part of it which belonged to them, nor the tribe of Benjamin from that part which was theirs; in short, they became so much masters of it, that it was called, even in later times, Jebus, and the city of the Jebusites; see ( Joshua 15:63 ) ( Judges 1:21 ) ( Judges 19:10 Judges 19:11 ) ; which spake unto David; when he came up against them, and besieged them: except thou take away the blind and lame, thou shalt not come in hither; which many understand of their idols and images, which had eyes, but saw not, and feet, but walked not, which therefore David and his men in derision called the blind and lame; these the Jebusites placed for the defence of their city, and put great confidence in them for the security of it, and therefore said to David, unless you can remove these, which you scornfully call the blind and the lame, you will never be able to take the place. It was strongly fortified and deemed so impregnable that the blind and lame were sent to man the battlements, in derisive mockery of the Hebrew king's attack, and to shout, "David cannot come in hither." 2 Samuel 5:6. 3 So all the elders of Israel came to the king to Hebron; and king David made a league with them in Hebron before the LORD: and they anointed David king over Israel. have resisted, thee, saying, That David shall not come hither. David’s dear desire was to build a Temple for the Lord, but he was required to forgo the longings of his heart in favour of his son, whom God had decided would be the man to erect the House of God – for His greater glory. 2 In the past, while Saul was king over us, you were the one who led Israel on their military campaigns. 2 Samuel 5:6-10 New International Version (NIV) David Conquers Jerusalem. "With all the difficulties of this text, it is important that the juxtaposition that the text itself gives us of David's coronation, his conquering of Jerusalem and this oddly prominent prohibition of the blind and the lame from the … 2 Samuel 5:1. One helpful tool were the pictures, which gave good visual aid to teaching. Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:6-10 (Read 2 Samuel 5:6-10) The enemies of God's people are often very confident of their own strength, and most secure when their day to fall draws nigh. David Guzik commentary on 2 Samuel 5, where the elders of all Israel recognize David as king, and he is make king over a united Israel. OTHER CHARTS RELATED TO SECOND SAMUEL David makes Jerusalem the political and religious centre of Israel (2 Samuel 5:6-12; 2 Samuel 6:1-17). To understand the full meaning and force of this insulting taunt, it is necessary to bear in mind the depth and steepness of the valley of Gihon, and the lofty walls of the ancient Canaanitish fortress. (c) Vid. spake to David, saying, Thou shalt not come hither except thou remove the blind and the lame; For the blind and lame shall keep thee off. A very good introductory-intermediate level commentary. Nepot. Except thou take away.—A better translation is, Thou shalt not come hither; but the blind and the lame shall keep thee off. Biblical Commentary 2 Samuel 5:1-5, 9-10 EXEGESIS: THE CONTEXT: The book of First Samuel ends with the death of King Saul and his three sons (1 Samuel 31). It was not just a small group of Israelites, but “all the house of Israel” (2 Samuel 6:15). This volume of the Evangelical Exegetical Commentary represents the final work of renowned scholar Harry A. Hoffner, Jr. An expert Hittitologist, Hoffner brings his understanding of ancient Near Eastern cultures to the text of 1–2 Samuel, providing a commentary that is sure to make an impact for years to come. l. 3. c. 9. Vit. 2 Then David and all the people who were with him set out for Baala of Judah to bring up from there the ark of God, which bears the name “the LORD of hosts enthroned above the cherubim.” b 3 They … And the king and his men went to Jerusalem Which, at least part of it, belonged to the tribe of Benjamin; and therefore until all Israel, and that tribe, with the rest, made him king, he did not attempt the reduction of it, but now he immediately set out on an expedition against it: The failed first attempt. 2 SAMUEL RESOURCES 2 Samuel Commentary, Sermon, Illustration, Devotional. ab Alex. Over the next three weeks, we move from a “yes-but” narrative (2 Samuel 6) to a “YES!” narrative (2 Samuel 7) to a “NO!” narrative (2 Samuel 11). 2 Samuel 5-6 New International Version (NIV) David Becomes King Over Israel. Each chapter pulls out only select verses of the text to comment on. And certain it is the Heathens had their tutelar gods for their cities as well as their houses, in which they greatly trusted for their safety; and therefore with the Romans, when they besieged a city, the first thing they attempted to do was by any means, as by songs particularly, to get the tutelar gods out of it (b); believing otherwise it would never be taken by them; or if it could, it was not lawful to make the gods captives (c): and to this sense most of the Jewish commentators agree, as Kimchi, Jarchi, Ben Gersom, and R. Isaiah, who take them to be images; some say, made of brass, which were placed either in the streets of the city, or on the towers: it was usual with all nations to place on their walls both their household and country gods, to defend them from the enemy (d). 1 & 2 Samuel. unto the Jebusites, the inhabitants of the land: who inhabited the country about it, and even dwelt in that itself; for the tribe of Judah could not drive them out at first from that part of it which belonged to them, nor the tribe of Benjamin from that part which was theirs; in short, they became so much masters of it, that it was called, even in later times, Jebus, and the city of the Jebusites; see Joshua 15:63 Judges 1:21. which spake unto David; when he came up against them, and besieged them: except thou take away the blind and lame, thou shalt not come in hither; which many understand of their idols and images, which had eyes, but saw not, and feet, but walked not, which therefore David and his men in derision called the blind and lame; these the Jebusites placed for the defence of their city, and put great confidence in them for the security of it, and therefore said to David, unless you can remove these, which you scornfully call the blind and the lame, you will never be able to take the place. Macrob. Building off his monumental commentary on 1 Samuel, Andrew Steinmann continues his work on this single Hebrew book with the 2 Samuel Concordia Commentary. He accepts the general consensus that 2 Samuel is made up from four main blocks of … Chart from recommended resource Jensen's Survey of the OT - used by permission 2 Samuel Chart from Charles Swindoll. In 2 Samuel 6, David moves the neglected ark to his new capital in order to place God back into the center of communal life. The Book of 2 Samuel begins with David being made … Article Images Copyright © 2020 Getty Images unless otherwise indicated. The Jebusites, confident in the natural strength of their fortress, boast that even the lame and the blind could defend it. 2 Samuel 5:6-12. Much earlier in that book, we learned that Saul … A. He was an expert on the ancient Near East … John Trapp Complete Commentary. Commentary, 2 Samuel 5:1-5, 9-10, Samuel Giere, Preaching This Week, WorkingPreacher.org, 2012. The commentary on the books of Samuel is a great example of Baldwin’s high quality work. 2 Samuel 5:6. 4 David was thirty years old when he began to reign, and he reigned forty years. 2 Samuel 5:5 : 2 Samuel 5:7 >> American Standard Version And the king and his men went to Jerusalem against the Jebusites, the inhabitants of the land, who … The sections on ‘Translation’ and ‘Notes’ are, in this reviewer’s opinion, the greatest strength of the commentary. Except thou take away the blind ... - Rather, "and (the Jebusite) spake to David, saying, Thou shalt not come hither, but the blind and the lame shall keep thee off," i. e. so far shalt thou be from taking the stronghold from us, that the lame and blind shall suffice to defend the place. Dier. (b) Vid. 2 Samuel 15 Commentary, One of over 110 Bible commentaries freely available, this commentary, once the most popular commentary, is favored by … of Arnold’s commentary on the books of Samuel in the NIVAC series is one … Tequila Rose Recipes, 2017 Les Paul Tribute Specs, Mohair Typically Used In, Mrs Wages 1 Step Pickle Mix, Legal Risk In Cloud Computing, Al Fakher Hookah Tobacco Wholesale, Quadratic Equation Calculator, " />> The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment Sign up for the Berean: Daily Verse and Comment, and have Biblical truth delivered to your inbox. (e) Gregory's Notes and Observations, &c. ch. 2 Samuel 5:6–10 6 c And the king and his men went to Jerusalem d against the Jebusites, the inhabitants of the land, who said to David, “You will not come in here, but the blind and the lame will ward you off”—thinking, “David cannot come in here.” 7 Nevertheless, David took the stronghold of Zion, e that is, the city of David. 7. It has been several years since I read the excellent book by Langdon Gilkey entitled Shantung Compound. 5. Then came all the tribes to David — That is, elders, deputed as ambassadors from every tribe, sent by a common agreement among them; saying, Behold, we are bone of thy bone, &c. — Abner and Ish-bosheth being dead, whose authority had swayed the Israelites against their duty, they now acknowledged … A learned countryman of ours F5 is of opinion that these were statues or images talismanically made, under a certain constellation, by some skilful in astrology, placed in the recess of the fort, and intrusted with the keeping of it, and in which the utmost confidence was put: but it seems better with Aben Ezra and Abarbinel, and so Josephus F6, to understand this of blind and lame men; and that the sense is, that the Jebusites had such an opinion of the strength of their city, that a few blind and lame men were sufficient to defend it against David and his army; and perhaps in contempt of him placed some invalids, blind and lame men, on the walls of it, and jeeringly told him, that unless he could remove them, he would never take the city: thinking: or "saying" F7; this was the substance of what they said, or what they meant by it: David cannot come in hither; it is impossible for him to enter it, he cannot and shall not do it, and very probably these words were put into the mouths of the blind and lame, and they said them frequently. 2 Samuel 2 Samuel Devotional Commentary ... 2 Samuel 7:22. Our text in 2 Samuel informs us that there was great celebration as the ark was brought to Jerusalem. Psalm 132 is commonly associated with the events of this chapter. HE TAKES ZION FROM THE JEBUSITES. On questions of authorship and composition, Anderson moves in the mainstream of contemporary scholarship. Please enter your email address associated with your Salem All-Pass account, then click Continue. Genial. A list of the best commentaries on 1/2 Samuel ranked by scholars, journal reviews, and site users. California - Do Not Sell My Personal Information. (f) Antiqu. Available at logos.com. A learned countryman of ours (e) is of opinion that these were statues or images talismanically made, under a certain constellation, by some skilful in astrology, placed in the recess of the fort, and intrusted with the keeping of it, and in which the utmost confidence was put: but it seems better with Aben Ezra and Abarbinel, and so Josephus (f), to understand this of blind and lame men; and that the sense is, that the Jebusites had such an opinion of the strength of their city, that a few blind and lame men were sufficient to defend it against David and his army; and perhaps in contempt of him placed some invalids, blind and lame men, on the walls of it, and jeeringly told him, that unless he could remove them, he would never take the city: thinking: or "saying" (g); this was the substance of what they said, or what they meant by it: David cannot come in hither; it is impossible for him to enter it, he cannot and shall not do it, and very probably these words were put into the mouths of the blind and lame, and they said them frequently. Their citadel was upon Mount Zion, the highest of the hills of Jerusalem, south-west of the temple hill of Moriah, and surrounded on three sides by deep valleys. Valtrinum de re militar. The parallel account in 1 Chronicles is even more detailed. 5 All the tribes of Israel came to David at Hebron and said, “We are your own flesh and blood. Thou shalt not come hither; but the blind and the lame shall keep thee off. ((g) "dicendo", Pagninus, Montanus. Themistocl. However, the pictures alone are not worth the price of this commentary. CHAPTER 6. This expression, he useth to admonish David, that he was not made a king to advance his own glory, but for the good of his people; whom he ought to rule with all tenderness, and to watch over with all diligence. Which spake unto David … (1-2) Bringing the ark of God to Jerusalem. 6 The king and his men marched to Jerusalem to attack the Jebusites, who lived there. All rights reserved. Salem Media Group. 2 Samuel 5:6 Context. Shalt feed — That is, rule them, and take care of them, as a shepherd doth of his sheep, Psalms 78:70,71. We'll send you an email with steps on how to reset your password. 2 Samuel 6 – David Brings the Ark of God into Jerusalem. Thou shalt not come hither, for the blind and the lame resist. Again David gathered all the choice men of Israel, thirty thousand. But the pride and insolence of the Jebusites animated David, and the Lord God of hosts was with him. 5 In Hebron he reigned over Judah seven years and six … 6. the king and his men went to Jerusalem unto the Jebusites—The first expedition of David, as king of the whole country, was directed against this place, which had hitherto remained in the hands of the natives. Rom. 1 a David again assembled all the picked men of Israel, thirty thousand in number. Bill T. Arnold — 1 & 2 Samuel (NIV Application Commentary, 2003). The Teach the Text Commentary Series gives pastors the best of biblical scholarship and presents the information needed to move seamlessly from … And the Lord said to you, ‘You will shepherd my people … Robert B. Chisholm Jr.’s volume on the books of 1–2 Samuel provides carefully organized guidance for interpreting, teaching, and illustrating these important historical books. l. 5. c. 5. Copyright © 2020, Bible Study Tools. l. 2. c. 7. One chapter is entitled, “A Place of One's Own.” Gilkey was interned in a Japanese detention camp, along with a diverse group of people, who all had one thing in common -- they were all Westerners. You can find the best commentary on 1/2 Samuel for you using the tools on the right side. Commentaries on 1/2 Samuel. l. 7. c. 3. sect. The Jebusites said to David, “You will not get in here; even … And the king and his men went to Jerusalem Which, at least part of it, belonged to the tribe of Benjamin; and therefore until all Israel, and that tribe, with the rest, made him king, he did not attempt the reduction of it, but now he immediately set out on an expedition against it: unto the Jebusites, the inhabitants of the land: who inhabited the country about it, and even dwelt in that itself; for the tribe of Judah could not drive them out at first from that part of it which belonged to them, nor the tribe of Benjamin from that part which was theirs; in short, they became so much masters of it, that it was called, even in later times, Jebus, and the city of the Jebusites; see ( Joshua 15:63 ) ( Judges 1:21 ) ( Judges 19:10 Judges 19:11 ) ; which spake unto David; when he came up against them, and besieged them: except thou take away the blind and lame, thou shalt not come in hither; which many understand of their idols and images, which had eyes, but saw not, and feet, but walked not, which therefore David and his men in derision called the blind and lame; these the Jebusites placed for the defence of their city, and put great confidence in them for the security of it, and therefore said to David, unless you can remove these, which you scornfully call the blind and the lame, you will never be able to take the place. It was strongly fortified and deemed so impregnable that the blind and lame were sent to man the battlements, in derisive mockery of the Hebrew king's attack, and to shout, "David cannot come in hither." 2 Samuel 5:6. 3 So all the elders of Israel came to the king to Hebron; and king David made a league with them in Hebron before the LORD: and they anointed David king over Israel. have resisted, thee, saying, That David shall not come hither. David’s dear desire was to build a Temple for the Lord, but he was required to forgo the longings of his heart in favour of his son, whom God had decided would be the man to erect the House of God – for His greater glory. 2 In the past, while Saul was king over us, you were the one who led Israel on their military campaigns. 2 Samuel 5:6-10 New International Version (NIV) David Conquers Jerusalem. "With all the difficulties of this text, it is important that the juxtaposition that the text itself gives us of David's coronation, his conquering of Jerusalem and this oddly prominent prohibition of the blind and the lame from the … 2 Samuel 5:1. One helpful tool were the pictures, which gave good visual aid to teaching. Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:6-10 (Read 2 Samuel 5:6-10) The enemies of God's people are often very confident of their own strength, and most secure when their day to fall draws nigh. David Guzik commentary on 2 Samuel 5, where the elders of all Israel recognize David as king, and he is make king over a united Israel. OTHER CHARTS RELATED TO SECOND SAMUEL David makes Jerusalem the political and religious centre of Israel (2 Samuel 5:6-12; 2 Samuel 6:1-17). To understand the full meaning and force of this insulting taunt, it is necessary to bear in mind the depth and steepness of the valley of Gihon, and the lofty walls of the ancient Canaanitish fortress. (c) Vid. spake to David, saying, Thou shalt not come hither except thou remove the blind and the lame; For the blind and lame shall keep thee off. A very good introductory-intermediate level commentary. Nepot. Except thou take away.—A better translation is, Thou shalt not come hither; but the blind and the lame shall keep thee off. Biblical Commentary 2 Samuel 5:1-5, 9-10 EXEGESIS: THE CONTEXT: The book of First Samuel ends with the death of King Saul and his three sons (1 Samuel 31). It was not just a small group of Israelites, but “all the house of Israel” (2 Samuel 6:15). This volume of the Evangelical Exegetical Commentary represents the final work of renowned scholar Harry A. Hoffner, Jr. An expert Hittitologist, Hoffner brings his understanding of ancient Near Eastern cultures to the text of 1–2 Samuel, providing a commentary that is sure to make an impact for years to come. l. 3. c. 9. Vit. 2 Then David and all the people who were with him set out for Baala of Judah to bring up from there the ark of God, which bears the name “the LORD of hosts enthroned above the cherubim.” b 3 They … And the king and his men went to Jerusalem Which, at least part of it, belonged to the tribe of Benjamin; and therefore until all Israel, and that tribe, with the rest, made him king, he did not attempt the reduction of it, but now he immediately set out on an expedition against it: The failed first attempt. 2 SAMUEL RESOURCES 2 Samuel Commentary, Sermon, Illustration, Devotional. ab Alex. Over the next three weeks, we move from a “yes-but” narrative (2 Samuel 6) to a “YES!” narrative (2 Samuel 7) to a “NO!” narrative (2 Samuel 11). 2 Samuel 5-6 New International Version (NIV) David Becomes King Over Israel. Each chapter pulls out only select verses of the text to comment on. And certain it is the Heathens had their tutelar gods for their cities as well as their houses, in which they greatly trusted for their safety; and therefore with the Romans, when they besieged a city, the first thing they attempted to do was by any means, as by songs particularly, to get the tutelar gods out of it (b); believing otherwise it would never be taken by them; or if it could, it was not lawful to make the gods captives (c): and to this sense most of the Jewish commentators agree, as Kimchi, Jarchi, Ben Gersom, and R. Isaiah, who take them to be images; some say, made of brass, which were placed either in the streets of the city, or on the towers: it was usual with all nations to place on their walls both their household and country gods, to defend them from the enemy (d). 1 & 2 Samuel. unto the Jebusites, the inhabitants of the land: who inhabited the country about it, and even dwelt in that itself; for the tribe of Judah could not drive them out at first from that part of it which belonged to them, nor the tribe of Benjamin from that part which was theirs; in short, they became so much masters of it, that it was called, even in later times, Jebus, and the city of the Jebusites; see Joshua 15:63 Judges 1:21. which spake unto David; when he came up against them, and besieged them: except thou take away the blind and lame, thou shalt not come in hither; which many understand of their idols and images, which had eyes, but saw not, and feet, but walked not, which therefore David and his men in derision called the blind and lame; these the Jebusites placed for the defence of their city, and put great confidence in them for the security of it, and therefore said to David, unless you can remove these, which you scornfully call the blind and the lame, you will never be able to take the place. Macrob. Building off his monumental commentary on 1 Samuel, Andrew Steinmann continues his work on this single Hebrew book with the 2 Samuel Concordia Commentary. He accepts the general consensus that 2 Samuel is made up from four main blocks of … Chart from recommended resource Jensen's Survey of the OT - used by permission 2 Samuel Chart from Charles Swindoll. In 2 Samuel 6, David moves the neglected ark to his new capital in order to place God back into the center of communal life. The Book of 2 Samuel begins with David being made … Article Images Copyright © 2020 Getty Images unless otherwise indicated. The Jebusites, confident in the natural strength of their fortress, boast that even the lame and the blind could defend it. 2 Samuel 5:6-12. Much earlier in that book, we learned that Saul … A. He was an expert on the ancient Near East … John Trapp Complete Commentary. Commentary, 2 Samuel 5:1-5, 9-10, Samuel Giere, Preaching This Week, WorkingPreacher.org, 2012. The commentary on the books of Samuel is a great example of Baldwin’s high quality work. 2 Samuel 5:6. 4 David was thirty years old when he began to reign, and he reigned forty years. 2 Samuel 5:5 : 2 Samuel 5:7 >> American Standard Version And the king and his men went to Jerusalem against the Jebusites, the inhabitants of the land, who … The sections on ‘Translation’ and ‘Notes’ are, in this reviewer’s opinion, the greatest strength of the commentary. Except thou take away the blind ... - Rather, "and (the Jebusite) spake to David, saying, Thou shalt not come hither, but the blind and the lame shall keep thee off," i. e. so far shalt thou be from taking the stronghold from us, that the lame and blind shall suffice to defend the place. Dier. (b) Vid. 2 Samuel 15 Commentary, One of over 110 Bible commentaries freely available, this commentary, once the most popular commentary, is favored by … of Arnold’s commentary on the books of Samuel in the NIVAC series is one … Tequila Rose Recipes, 2017 Les Paul Tribute Specs, Mohair Typically Used In, Mrs Wages 1 Step Pickle Mix, Legal Risk In Cloud Computing, Al Fakher Hookah Tobacco Wholesale, Quadratic Equation Calculator, ">
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2 samuel 5:6 commentary

However, the … Continue reading "Commentary on 2 Samuel … Thou shalt not come hither, but the blind and the lame shall drive thee away. The Ark Brought to Jerusalem. The richness of 1 & 2 Samuel lends itself to many layers of application and theological truths, but the author rarely explored them. Proud member 2 Samuel 5:6–10 The Conquest of Jerusalem 6 k And the king and his men went to Jerusalem against l the Jebusites, the inhabitants of the land, who spoke to David, saying, “You shall not come in here; but the blind and the lame will repel you,” thinking, “David cannot come in here.” 7 Nevertheless David took the stronghold … l. 6. c. 4. Both the word of Jehovah (2 Samuel 7:4-16) and the words of David (2 Samuel 23:1-7) stress the importance of the God-given kingdom. Saturnal. 1. And the king and his men went to Jerusalem to the Jebusites, the inhabitants of the land: which spoke to David, saying, Except you take away the blind and the lame, you shall not come in here: thinking, David cannot come in here. Choose a verse from '2 Samuel 1' to begin your 'Verse-by-Verse' study of God's Word using the more than 100 commentaries available on StudyLight.org 1. Biblical Commentary 2 Samuel 7:1-16 EXEGESIS: THE CONTEXT: Second Samuel begins with David mourning the death of Saul and Jonathan (chapter 1) and being anointed king of Judah (2:1-7). People's Commentary (NT) Robertson's Word Pictures (NT) Scofield: Definitions: Interlinear: Library: Topical Studies: X-References: Verse Comparison: 2 Samuel 5:6. Commentary on 2 Samuel 7:1-11, 16 View Bible Text Within David’s checkered story (a patchwork of triumph and downfall) comes a pivotal glimpse into the Lord’s relationship with David, Israel, and ultimately all of history by way of the promise of an eternal “house.” (c) The children of God called idols blind and lame guides: therefore the Jebusites meant that they should prove that their gods were neither blind nor lame. The Japenese did not know what to do with all the Westerners present in the country when the Japanese overra… 2 Samuel 22 is one of the final chapters of the Books of Samuel in the Hebrew Bible (or the 22nd chapter of the "Second Book of Samuel" in the Old Testament of the Christian Bible).It contains a Song of Thanksgiving attributed to King David which corresponds to Psalm 18. (d) Cornel. The king and his men went to Jerusalem — His first warlike enterprise, after he was made king of all Israel, was against that part of Jerusalem which was still in the hands of the Jebusites, namely, the strong fort of Zion, which they held, although the Israelites dwelt in the other parts of the city. Except thou take away the blind and the lame, thou shalt not come in hither; Thou shalt not come in hither, but the blind and the lame shall remove or hinder thee, And the king and his men went to Jerusalem unto the Jebusites, the inhabitants of the land: which spake unto David, saying, Except thou take away the, Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers, Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament. On the first ill-fated journey with the ark, musicians accompanied the ark (2 Samuel … Alex. 6. the king and his men went to Jerusalem unto the Jebusites--The first expedition of David, as king of the whole country, was directed against this place, which had hitherto remained in the hands of the natives. 2 Samuel 5:6 And the king and his men went to Jerusalem unto the Jebusites, the inhabitants of the land: which spake unto David, saying, Except thou take away the blind and the lame, thou shalt not come in hither: thinking, David cannot come in hither. The 1&2 Samuel Evangelical Exegetical Commentary (EEC) is the final work of beloved and renowned scholar Harry A. Hoffner Jr. Hoffner, before his recent death in March 2015, was John A. Wilson Professor of Hittitology Emeritus at the University of Chicago. Abner, the commander of Saul's army, made Ishbaal, Saul's son, king of Israel—resulting in warfare between Israel And certain it is the Heathens had their tutelar gods for their cities as well as their houses, in which they greatly trusted for their safety; and therefore with the Romans, when they besieged a city, the first thing they attempted to do was by any means, as by songs particularly, to get the tutelar gods out of it F2; believing otherwise it would never be taken by them; or if it could, it was not lawful to make the gods captives F3: and to this sense most of the Jewish commentators agree, as Kimchi, Jarchi, Ben Gersom, and R. Isaiah, who take them to be images; some say, made of brass, which were placed either in the streets of the city, or on the towers: it was usual with all nations to place on their walls both their household and country gods, to defend them from the enemy F4. saying, Except thou take away the blind and the lame, thou shalt not come hither —, The king and his men went to Jerusalem unto the Jebusite, inhabiting the land, and he. But it is not necessary that this should be a proverb; for the words may be thus rendered, as it is in the margin of our Bible, Because they had said, even the blind and the lame, He (i. e. David) shall not come into the house; or, Because they (i. e. the Jebusites) had said, The blind and the lame shall hinder him; (which words are easily supplied out of 2 Samuel 5:6… who had eyes, but saw not; feet, but walked not. Other Forerunner Commentary entries containing 2 Samuel 7:16: Genesis 38:27-30 1 Kings 11:11-13 1 Chronicles 22:10 2 Samuel 7:15 : 2 Samuel 7:17 >> The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment Sign up for the Berean: Daily Verse and Comment, and have Biblical truth delivered to your inbox. (e) Gregory's Notes and Observations, &c. ch. 2 Samuel 5:6–10 6 c And the king and his men went to Jerusalem d against the Jebusites, the inhabitants of the land, who said to David, “You will not come in here, but the blind and the lame will ward you off”—thinking, “David cannot come in here.” 7 Nevertheless, David took the stronghold of Zion, e that is, the city of David. 7. It has been several years since I read the excellent book by Langdon Gilkey entitled Shantung Compound. 5. Then came all the tribes to David — That is, elders, deputed as ambassadors from every tribe, sent by a common agreement among them; saying, Behold, we are bone of thy bone, &c. — Abner and Ish-bosheth being dead, whose authority had swayed the Israelites against their duty, they now acknowledged … A learned countryman of ours F5 is of opinion that these were statues or images talismanically made, under a certain constellation, by some skilful in astrology, placed in the recess of the fort, and intrusted with the keeping of it, and in which the utmost confidence was put: but it seems better with Aben Ezra and Abarbinel, and so Josephus F6, to understand this of blind and lame men; and that the sense is, that the Jebusites had such an opinion of the strength of their city, that a few blind and lame men were sufficient to defend it against David and his army; and perhaps in contempt of him placed some invalids, blind and lame men, on the walls of it, and jeeringly told him, that unless he could remove them, he would never take the city: thinking: or "saying" F7; this was the substance of what they said, or what they meant by it: David cannot come in hither; it is impossible for him to enter it, he cannot and shall not do it, and very probably these words were put into the mouths of the blind and lame, and they said them frequently. 2 Samuel 2 Samuel Devotional Commentary ... 2 Samuel 7:22. Our text in 2 Samuel informs us that there was great celebration as the ark was brought to Jerusalem. Psalm 132 is commonly associated with the events of this chapter. HE TAKES ZION FROM THE JEBUSITES. On questions of authorship and composition, Anderson moves in the mainstream of contemporary scholarship. Please enter your email address associated with your Salem All-Pass account, then click Continue. Genial. A list of the best commentaries on 1/2 Samuel ranked by scholars, journal reviews, and site users. California - Do Not Sell My Personal Information. (f) Antiqu. Available at logos.com. A learned countryman of ours (e) is of opinion that these were statues or images talismanically made, under a certain constellation, by some skilful in astrology, placed in the recess of the fort, and intrusted with the keeping of it, and in which the utmost confidence was put: but it seems better with Aben Ezra and Abarbinel, and so Josephus (f), to understand this of blind and lame men; and that the sense is, that the Jebusites had such an opinion of the strength of their city, that a few blind and lame men were sufficient to defend it against David and his army; and perhaps in contempt of him placed some invalids, blind and lame men, on the walls of it, and jeeringly told him, that unless he could remove them, he would never take the city: thinking: or "saying" (g); this was the substance of what they said, or what they meant by it: David cannot come in hither; it is impossible for him to enter it, he cannot and shall not do it, and very probably these words were put into the mouths of the blind and lame, and they said them frequently. Their citadel was upon Mount Zion, the highest of the hills of Jerusalem, south-west of the temple hill of Moriah, and surrounded on three sides by deep valleys. Valtrinum de re militar. The parallel account in 1 Chronicles is even more detailed. 5 All the tribes of Israel came to David at Hebron and said, “We are your own flesh and blood. Thou shalt not come hither; but the blind and the lame shall keep thee off. ((g) "dicendo", Pagninus, Montanus. Themistocl. However, the pictures alone are not worth the price of this commentary. CHAPTER 6. This expression, he useth to admonish David, that he was not made a king to advance his own glory, but for the good of his people; whom he ought to rule with all tenderness, and to watch over with all diligence. Which spake unto David … (1-2) Bringing the ark of God to Jerusalem. 6 The king and his men marched to Jerusalem to attack the Jebusites, who lived there. All rights reserved. Salem Media Group. 2 Samuel 5:6 Context. Shalt feed — That is, rule them, and take care of them, as a shepherd doth of his sheep, Psalms 78:70,71. We'll send you an email with steps on how to reset your password. 2 Samuel 6 – David Brings the Ark of God into Jerusalem. Thou shalt not come hither, for the blind and the lame resist. Again David gathered all the choice men of Israel, thirty thousand. But the pride and insolence of the Jebusites animated David, and the Lord God of hosts was with him. 5 In Hebron he reigned over Judah seven years and six … 6. the king and his men went to Jerusalem unto the Jebusites—The first expedition of David, as king of the whole country, was directed against this place, which had hitherto remained in the hands of the natives. Rom. 1 a David again assembled all the picked men of Israel, thirty thousand in number. Bill T. Arnold — 1 & 2 Samuel (NIV Application Commentary, 2003). The Teach the Text Commentary Series gives pastors the best of biblical scholarship and presents the information needed to move seamlessly from … And the Lord said to you, ‘You will shepherd my people … Robert B. Chisholm Jr.’s volume on the books of 1–2 Samuel provides carefully organized guidance for interpreting, teaching, and illustrating these important historical books. l. 5. c. 5. Copyright © 2020, Bible Study Tools. l. 2. c. 7. One chapter is entitled, “A Place of One's Own.” Gilkey was interned in a Japanese detention camp, along with a diverse group of people, who all had one thing in common -- they were all Westerners. You can find the best commentary on 1/2 Samuel for you using the tools on the right side. Commentaries on 1/2 Samuel. l. 7. c. 3. sect. The Jebusites said to David, “You will not get in here; even … And the king and his men went to Jerusalem Which, at least part of it, belonged to the tribe of Benjamin; and therefore until all Israel, and that tribe, with the rest, made him king, he did not attempt the reduction of it, but now he immediately set out on an expedition against it: unto the Jebusites, the inhabitants of the land: who inhabited the country about it, and even dwelt in that itself; for the tribe of Judah could not drive them out at first from that part of it which belonged to them, nor the tribe of Benjamin from that part which was theirs; in short, they became so much masters of it, that it was called, even in later times, Jebus, and the city of the Jebusites; see ( Joshua 15:63 ) ( Judges 1:21 ) ( Judges 19:10 Judges 19:11 ) ; which spake unto David; when he came up against them, and besieged them: except thou take away the blind and lame, thou shalt not come in hither; which many understand of their idols and images, which had eyes, but saw not, and feet, but walked not, which therefore David and his men in derision called the blind and lame; these the Jebusites placed for the defence of their city, and put great confidence in them for the security of it, and therefore said to David, unless you can remove these, which you scornfully call the blind and the lame, you will never be able to take the place. It was strongly fortified and deemed so impregnable that the blind and lame were sent to man the battlements, in derisive mockery of the Hebrew king's attack, and to shout, "David cannot come in hither." 2 Samuel 5:6. 3 So all the elders of Israel came to the king to Hebron; and king David made a league with them in Hebron before the LORD: and they anointed David king over Israel. have resisted, thee, saying, That David shall not come hither. David’s dear desire was to build a Temple for the Lord, but he was required to forgo the longings of his heart in favour of his son, whom God had decided would be the man to erect the House of God – for His greater glory. 2 In the past, while Saul was king over us, you were the one who led Israel on their military campaigns. 2 Samuel 5:6-10 New International Version (NIV) David Conquers Jerusalem. "With all the difficulties of this text, it is important that the juxtaposition that the text itself gives us of David's coronation, his conquering of Jerusalem and this oddly prominent prohibition of the blind and the lame from the … 2 Samuel 5:1. One helpful tool were the pictures, which gave good visual aid to teaching. Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:6-10 (Read 2 Samuel 5:6-10) The enemies of God's people are often very confident of their own strength, and most secure when their day to fall draws nigh. David Guzik commentary on 2 Samuel 5, where the elders of all Israel recognize David as king, and he is make king over a united Israel. OTHER CHARTS RELATED TO SECOND SAMUEL David makes Jerusalem the political and religious centre of Israel (2 Samuel 5:6-12; 2 Samuel 6:1-17). To understand the full meaning and force of this insulting taunt, it is necessary to bear in mind the depth and steepness of the valley of Gihon, and the lofty walls of the ancient Canaanitish fortress. (c) Vid. spake to David, saying, Thou shalt not come hither except thou remove the blind and the lame; For the blind and lame shall keep thee off. A very good introductory-intermediate level commentary. Nepot. Except thou take away.—A better translation is, Thou shalt not come hither; but the blind and the lame shall keep thee off. Biblical Commentary 2 Samuel 5:1-5, 9-10 EXEGESIS: THE CONTEXT: The book of First Samuel ends with the death of King Saul and his three sons (1 Samuel 31). It was not just a small group of Israelites, but “all the house of Israel” (2 Samuel 6:15). This volume of the Evangelical Exegetical Commentary represents the final work of renowned scholar Harry A. Hoffner, Jr. An expert Hittitologist, Hoffner brings his understanding of ancient Near Eastern cultures to the text of 1–2 Samuel, providing a commentary that is sure to make an impact for years to come. l. 3. c. 9. Vit. 2 Then David and all the people who were with him set out for Baala of Judah to bring up from there the ark of God, which bears the name “the LORD of hosts enthroned above the cherubim.” b 3 They … And the king and his men went to Jerusalem Which, at least part of it, belonged to the tribe of Benjamin; and therefore until all Israel, and that tribe, with the rest, made him king, he did not attempt the reduction of it, but now he immediately set out on an expedition against it: The failed first attempt. 2 SAMUEL RESOURCES 2 Samuel Commentary, Sermon, Illustration, Devotional. ab Alex. Over the next three weeks, we move from a “yes-but” narrative (2 Samuel 6) to a “YES!” narrative (2 Samuel 7) to a “NO!” narrative (2 Samuel 11). 2 Samuel 5-6 New International Version (NIV) David Becomes King Over Israel. Each chapter pulls out only select verses of the text to comment on. And certain it is the Heathens had their tutelar gods for their cities as well as their houses, in which they greatly trusted for their safety; and therefore with the Romans, when they besieged a city, the first thing they attempted to do was by any means, as by songs particularly, to get the tutelar gods out of it (b); believing otherwise it would never be taken by them; or if it could, it was not lawful to make the gods captives (c): and to this sense most of the Jewish commentators agree, as Kimchi, Jarchi, Ben Gersom, and R. Isaiah, who take them to be images; some say, made of brass, which were placed either in the streets of the city, or on the towers: it was usual with all nations to place on their walls both their household and country gods, to defend them from the enemy (d). 1 & 2 Samuel. unto the Jebusites, the inhabitants of the land: who inhabited the country about it, and even dwelt in that itself; for the tribe of Judah could not drive them out at first from that part of it which belonged to them, nor the tribe of Benjamin from that part which was theirs; in short, they became so much masters of it, that it was called, even in later times, Jebus, and the city of the Jebusites; see Joshua 15:63 Judges 1:21. which spake unto David; when he came up against them, and besieged them: except thou take away the blind and lame, thou shalt not come in hither; which many understand of their idols and images, which had eyes, but saw not, and feet, but walked not, which therefore David and his men in derision called the blind and lame; these the Jebusites placed for the defence of their city, and put great confidence in them for the security of it, and therefore said to David, unless you can remove these, which you scornfully call the blind and the lame, you will never be able to take the place. Macrob. Building off his monumental commentary on 1 Samuel, Andrew Steinmann continues his work on this single Hebrew book with the 2 Samuel Concordia Commentary. He accepts the general consensus that 2 Samuel is made up from four main blocks of … Chart from recommended resource Jensen's Survey of the OT - used by permission 2 Samuel Chart from Charles Swindoll. In 2 Samuel 6, David moves the neglected ark to his new capital in order to place God back into the center of communal life. The Book of 2 Samuel begins with David being made … Article Images Copyright © 2020 Getty Images unless otherwise indicated. The Jebusites, confident in the natural strength of their fortress, boast that even the lame and the blind could defend it. 2 Samuel 5:6-12. Much earlier in that book, we learned that Saul … A. He was an expert on the ancient Near East … John Trapp Complete Commentary. Commentary, 2 Samuel 5:1-5, 9-10, Samuel Giere, Preaching This Week, WorkingPreacher.org, 2012. The commentary on the books of Samuel is a great example of Baldwin’s high quality work. 2 Samuel 5:6. 4 David was thirty years old when he began to reign, and he reigned forty years. 2 Samuel 5:5 : 2 Samuel 5:7 >> American Standard Version And the king and his men went to Jerusalem against the Jebusites, the inhabitants of the land, who … The sections on ‘Translation’ and ‘Notes’ are, in this reviewer’s opinion, the greatest strength of the commentary. Except thou take away the blind ... - Rather, "and (the Jebusite) spake to David, saying, Thou shalt not come hither, but the blind and the lame shall keep thee off," i. e. so far shalt thou be from taking the stronghold from us, that the lame and blind shall suffice to defend the place. Dier. (b) Vid. 2 Samuel 15 Commentary, One of over 110 Bible commentaries freely available, this commentary, once the most popular commentary, is favored by … of Arnold’s commentary on the books of Samuel in the NIVAC series is one …

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